100R Warren Street

Roxbury, MA  02119

Tel: 617-299-2604

© 2019 CREATED BY THE NATIONAL COUNCIL

We're Reimagining Our Communities

COMMUNITY-LED SOLUTIONS TO END THE INCARCERATION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS...

A collective contribution to changing decades of

mass incarceration and law enforcement led policies.

CLEMENCY 

CAMPAIGN

It’s time to free the thousands of women and girls who are incarcerated and deserve to be granted relief through clemency.

Hundreds of thousands of women and girls are currently incarcerated as a result of criminalization for what should be addressed as public health issues as a result of violence, poverty, mental illness and the illness of addiction. A prison will never be a place for a woman or girl to effectively begin to heal and advance her life. In most cases, incarceration of women has nothing to do with public safety and the disruption caused by the separation of mothers from children due to incarceration deepens poverty and further disenfranchises the communities most impacted by increasing rates of incarceration of women. Your governor has the power to do the right thing by granting them clemency.

In partnership with the National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls, we are calling on Governors around the country to reconsider the cases of those women and girls who need it most. Primarily Black women have been and continue to be the fastest-growing segment of the prison population in the United States -- making up 29 percent of the incarcerated population but only approximately 7 percent of the total population. But these women are not invisible to us. That’s why there is a growing number of residents who are organizing statewide clemency coalitions.  

These women and girls grapple with the trauma of harsh and lengthy sentences that have devastated their families socially and economically and destabilized entire communities in our state while costing what we consider a fiscally irresponsible expenditure of tax revenue. We must encourage Governors to exercise their clemency power to free women and girls who have been incarcerated for unjust reasons.

#FreeHer Fund

The FreeHer Fund is a new grant-making partnership between  CJI and The National Council of Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls.
 
The FreeHer Fund will support grassroots organizing that is based in awareness of the current political environment’s hostility toward the rights of women and girls; is led by women and girls directly impacted by the criminal legal system; and is working to restore or expand the rights of currently and/or formerly incarcerated women and girls.

BUILDING UP PEOPLE NOT PRISONS

We are actively engaged in campaigns in 4 States to significantly reduce the incarcertion of women and girls.

REIMAGINING COMMUNITIES

BROSURE

Select File

REPEAL 

1994' CRIME ACT

Our goal is to shift our justice and safety paradigm to one of community investment, healing, and restoration and away from punishment, mass criminalization and mass incarceration.

 

Repealing the 1994 crime bill and redirecting federal resources away from all relevant punitive programs is necessary.

REPEAL ASFA

ASFA enables states to forgo 'weasel out' of providing, “reasonable efforts” services to keep the child in the home, aka- in-home services and to reunify the family once and/or if the child was placed into state foster care. This was done intentionally by creating a number of loopholes and/or “exemptions” that states can use and/or exploit in order to justify child removals and termination of parental rights (TPR's). 

 

Thus, and for all intents and purposes, ASFA allows states to render a parent unfit for life.  Which means that state DHS agencies can, and often do, automatically remove future children based off of old allegations/substantiations and circumstances; regardless of the parent’s present situation . This violates the due process clause in the 5th and 14th amendments to the Constitution 

We Repeal ASFA by dismantling the system, targeting and weakening legislation which holds these discriminatory practices in place.